Degrees
Courses of Study
Policies
Examination, Promotions and Disqualification
Thesis Writing
Course Descriptions
Class Schedule
Online Grades


 




COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

A. MAIN DISCIPLINES

PHILO 101: INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY AND ST. THOMAS (3 units)
Course Description: Sertillanges’ book on The Intellectual Life serves as the spirituality and inspiration of the modes ‘how’ to study. The student is then initiated immediately to the reading and interpretation of selected original philosophical texts of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, and the major themes of modern and contemporary thought. The skills in writing and composing a term paper is included in the course – downloading from databases, the use of articles in Review of Literature, footnoting, bibliographical entries, etc. A syllabus is demonstrated and the daily class regimen is focused on participative discussions, recitations and quizzes.

Suggested Readings: A.G. Sertillanges, O.P., The Intellectual Life; The Apology (Plato), Aquinas/Aristotle – On the Soul, Posterior Analytics, Nicomachean Ethics, Metaphysics, Physics. A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, 6th Edition – Kate Turabian.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Norberto M. Castillo, O.P.

PHL 2: LOGIC I (3 units)
Course Description: This course is a systematic training in correct inferential reasoning as taught by Aristotle and practiced by Thomas Aquinas. It helps the students differentiate good from bad arguments and organize their thoughts expressed in the manner that is coherent, clear, and sensible. This course serves as an introductory part to symbolic or formal logic and other higher forms of sciences.

Course Objectives: To understand the basic character of Aristotelian logic; To recognize Aristotelian logic in philosophical and theological discussions; to use the tools of logic so as to express one’s ideas more clearly.

Suggested Readings: Aquinas’ Introduction to his Commentary on Aristotle’s Posterior Analytics. (1- 6); MENO by Plato; The Isogoge of Porphyry (Ch. 1 – 6); CATEGORIES by Aristotle (1-12); ON INTERPRETATION By Aristotle (1-8); PRIOR ANALYTICS By Aristotle BK 1 (1-7); POSTERIOR ANALYTICS by Aristotle (BK 1: 1-2, 13; BK 2); TOPICS by Aristotle (BK 1: 1-2, 12); ON SOPHISTICAL REFUTATIONS by Aristotle (BK 1: 1-5); RHETORIC by Aristotle (BK 1: 1-2); POETICS by Aristotle (CH 21)

Secondary Readings: Bachuber, Andrew. Introduction to Logic. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, Inc. 1957; Bauson, Preciliano. Logic for Filipinos. Mandaluyong, Philippines: National Bookstore, 2002; Kreeft, Peter. Socratic Logic. South Bend, Indiana: St. Augustine’s Press, 2005; Parallag, Cirilo Jr., et al. Integrated Logic: Multi-disciplinary Approach. Valenzuela City: Mega-Jesta Prints, Inc., 2006; Santiago, Alma. Logic: The Art of Reasoning. Manila, 2006.

Professor: Dr. Fleurdeliz Altez

PHILO 105: MATHEMATICAL LOGIC (LOGIC II) (2 units)
Course Description: Mathematical Logic / Modern Logic also known as Sentential Calculus or Propositional Calculus in some universities in North America deals with “logical connectives” that is fundamental in deductive arguments of every form. Mathematical Logic differs substantially from Traditional Logic through the use of Symbolic Language. These symbols have made Modern Logic as immeasurably more powerful tool for the analysis of argument.

Suggested Readings: Copi, Irving, Symbolic Logic, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1998; Copi, I. and Cohen C., Introduction to Logic, Prentice Hall, International, 1994; Delvin, Keith, The Language of Mathematics, A.W.H. Freeman New York, 2000; Tavuzzi, Michael, “Central Problems and Directions in the Philosophy of Mathematics,” Nature, Science and Values, Norberto Castillo, ed., Manila: Santo Tomas University Press, 1988; Thomas, Norman, Modern Logic, New York: Barnes and Noble, Inc., 1996; Veath, Henry, “Aristotelian and Mathematical Logic,” The Thomist, vol. 13 (1950), pp. 50-96.

Professor/s: Rev. Fr. Roland D. Mactal, O.P. / Rev. Fr. Hector Mariñas, O.P.

PHILO 106: PHILOSOPHY OF NATURE (COSMOLOGY) (3 units)
Course Description: The World of Mobile Beings, hylemorphism, the 10 Predicaments, Quantity, the Elements and Compounds, the Principles of Nature , the Individual as Matter Signed by Quantity, The Necessity of Matter, Causes are Causes of each other,

Suggested Readings: Aquinas’ Commentary on Physics; Aquinas’ The Principles of Nature; Aquinas’ Commentary on Aristotle’s Metaphysics; Aquinas’ Commentary on Aristotle’s Ethics

Professor: Rev. Fr. Norberto M. Castillo, O.P.

PHL3A: RATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 units)
Course Offerings: The philosophical concept of life. The nature and properties of the principle of life. The different kinds of life. The senses and the process of sensation. The sensitive appetite, the nature, origin and finality of the intellectual soul. The psychosomatic unity of man, the intellect and its ideogenetic activity; the nature of the human will and of its freedom. The synthesis of a complete human act. The phenomenological and psycho-analytic interpretation of the human person by comparison to the philosophical appraisal of its nature.

Suggested Readings: Aquinas’ De Anima; Aquinas’ Summa Theologiae

Professor: Rev. Fr. Nilo Lardizabal, OP

PHILO 108: METAPHYSICS (3 units)
Course Description: This course is intended to initiate the students to the Metaphysical Thoughts of St. Thomas. It begins with the study of the nature of Metaphysics (its scope, subject and proper objects), then it deals with “being” and the first principles, the causes, essence and existence (esse), act and potency, unity and the other transcendentals, the ontic composition of finite beings (substance-accidents, prime matter - substantial form), and concludes with the study of the actus purus. The students are required to read the basic texts of Aristotle and Aquinas.

Required Readings. Aquinas, St. Thomas. Commentary on Aristotle’s Metaphysics. Indiana: Dumb Ox Books, 1995; Aristotle. “Metaphysics” vol, 2 of The Complete Works of Aristotle, ed. by Jonathan Barnes. New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1995.

Auxiliary Readings. Elders, Leo, SVD. La Métaphysique de Saint Thomas d’Aquin dans une perspective historique. Paris: Libraire Philosophique, J. Vrin., 1994; Weisheipl, James, O.P. Friar Thomas D’Aquino (His Life, Thought and Work). New York: Doubleday, 1974; Wippel, John. The Metaphysical Thought of Thomas Aquinas (From Finite Being to Uncreated Being). Washington, D.C.:The Catholic University of America Press, 2000.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Maximo Gatela, O.P.

PHILO 9: THEODICY (3 units)
Course Description: The Problem of the Existence of God, its demonstrability, metaphysical foundation & criticisms (Aquinas), Knowledge of God (via remotions, the method of analogy, positive knowledge of God, God’s goodness, unity, infinity, divine intelligence and will), God and the World (creation conservation, divine intelligence and will).

Suggested Readings: Aquinas’ Summa Theologica, Prima Pars; Clarke, Norris (2007), The Philosophical Approach to God; Clarke, Norris (2001), The One and the Many; Davis, Brian (2002), Thomas Aquinas: Contemporary Philosophical Perspectives; De Young, McCluskey, & Van Dyke (2009), Aquinas’ Ethics; Kenny, Anthony (2003), The Five Ways: St. Thomas Aquinas; Kerr, Fergus (2002), After Aquinas; Garrigou Larange (1945), God, His Existence and His Nature.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Herminio Dagohoy, O.P.

PHILO 107: CRITICS / EPISTEMOLOGY (3 units)
Course Description: The correct statement and solution of the critical problem. The objective value of our knowledge. The truthfulness of the different cognitive faculties. Analysis of the different criteria of truth. The problem concerning the classification of sciences; their dependence and subordination; the manner how each one possesses truth.

Suggested Readings: Robert Audi, Epistemology: A Contemporary Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. New York : Routledge, 2003; Richard Feldman, Epistemology. Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Prentice Hall, c2003; The Oxford handbook of epistemology. Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2002; Archie Bahm, Epistemology: theory of knowledge. Albuquerque, N.M. : World Books, c1995; A Companion to epistemology. Oxford : Blackwell, 1993; Ralph Baergen, Contemporary epistemology. Fort Worth : Harcourt, Brace College Pub., c1995; Matthias Steup, An Introduction to contemporary epistemology. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1996.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Nilo Lardizabal, OP

PHL 6: ETHICS (3 units)
The Nicomachean Ethics and Aquinas’ Commentary were used during the course Introduction to Philosophy. Other portions of the text which were not touched or discussed should be taken up, e.g. Friendship, Justice. The connection between Ethics and Metaphysics is established. Special questions are taken from domestic ethics, political science and professional ethics, together with the basics and fundamentals of moral theology in the form of case studies.

Suggested Readings: The Nicomachean Ethics (Terence Irwin, 2nd Ed.), Aristotle’s First Principles (T. Irwin), The Magna Moralia, The Eudemian Ethics, Aquinas’ Commmentaries on Ethics and Metaphysics, Aquinas’ On Evil (Trans. John Oesterle),

Professors: Rev. Fr. Norberto M. Castillo, O.P.

PHILO 102: HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY (3 units)
Course Description: This course studies important ideas of early Greek thinkers from the Milesian up to the early Christian philosophers. Since the course involves multi-layered histories, the discussion will be structured chronologically and a thematic treatment will be presented towards the end of the course for a systematic and critical evaluation.

Objectives: The main objective of this course is for the students to have a meaningful encounter with the ideas and concepts of early Greek thinkers who shaped the history of western civilization. By understanding the histories of ideas, the students are expected to appreciate the dialectical dynamism inherent in philosophy itself. Secondly, the course aims to relate these ideas with contemporary human condition and experience.

Brief Summary of Topics: The mythological and rational presuppositions of the Milesians’ solutions to the problem of change; The principles of numbers as seminal understanding of the notion of Form and its ethical implications; The antinomies between Heraclitus’principle of becoming and Parminedes’concept of being inherent in the concept of Logos and Nous; Empedocles’ four roots, Anaxagoras’ concept of the Mind and Democritus’ idea of atoms as solutions to Parmenidian problem of motion; The appearance of the Sophists. Protagoras’concept of man as the measure of everything and the birth of relativism in the history of western philosophy; Socrates’ life and method. Xenophon’s Socrates and Plato’s Socrates. The meaning of virtue and the good life; Plato’s theory of ideas; cosmology; political ideas and concept of the good and the immortality of the soul; Aristotle’s theory of nature; the concept of the four causes; the categories. Aristotle’s concept of good and happiness; The hedonism of Epicurus; the Stoic ethics and Scepticism in the Academy; The influence of Plato on Plotinus and Plotinus’ concept of the Trinity.

Main Reference: Kenny, Anthony. Ancient Philosophy. A New History of Western Philosophy, Volume 1. Oxford University Press, 2006; Cohen, Curd, Reeve (eds.), Readings in Ancient Greek Philosophy, 2nd Edition. Hackett Publishing Company, Indianapolis/Cambridge, 2005.

Other References: Reale, Giovanni. Plato and Aristotle. Trans. John Catan. State University of New York Press. Albany, 1990; Guthrie, W.K.C., A History of Greek Philosophy. Volume 1 and VI. Cambridge University Press, 1965; Taylor, C.C.W. From the Beginning to Plato. Routledge History of Philosophy, Volume 1. Routledge, New Fetter Lane, London. 1997; Stumf, Enoch, et.al. Socrates to Sartre and Beyond. A History of Philosophy, Volume 1. McGraw-Hill International Ediction. 2008; Trundle, Robert. Ancient Greek Philosophy: Its Development and Relevance to Our Time. Avebury. Ashgate Publishing House. 1994.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Herminio Dagohoy, O.P.

PHILO 104: HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY (3 units)
Course Description: A history of thought beginning from the age of the Fathers (St. Augustine, Boethius, etc…) down to the period of Renaissance (Francis Suarez). It aims to highlight the coming to be of movements and birthings of institutions and thoughts shaped by the confluencing factors of the time engendered by faith. Philosophy happens in the real life. The focus is given on the thought on God, on man, on society and the blending of these.

Suggested Readings: Mauer, Armand, CSB. Medieval Philosophy. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, 1982; Cantor, Norman. The Civilization of the Middle Ages. New York: Harper Collins (revised edition), 1993; Chenu, M.D. Nature, Man and Society of the 20th Century. Canada: Medieval Academy of America, 1997; Davies, Brian. The Thought of Thomas Aquinas. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992; Evans, G.R. Philosophy and Theology in the Middle Ages. London: Routledge, 1993; Kenny, Anthony. Medieval Philosophy, vol. 2. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2005; McGrade, A.S. (ed.) The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Maximo Gatela, O.P.

PHILO 109: HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY (3 units)
Course Description: This course covers the different philosophers and their philosophical systems from the fourteenth century until the close of the last century.

Readings: Radcliffe, Elizabeth, and Richard McCarty, eds. Late Modern Philosophy : essential readings with commentary. Oxford: Blackwell Pub. Ltd., 2007; Martinich, A.P. Early Modern Philosophy: essential readings with commentary. Oxford: Blackwell Pub., 2007; Kolak, Daniel. The Longman Standard History of Modern Philosophy. New York: Pearson/Longman, 2006; Ariew, Roger. Modern Philosophy: an anthology of primary sources. Indianapolis: Hackett, 1998; Scruton, Roger. A Short History of Modern Philosophy: from Descartes to Wittgenstein. London: Routledge, 1995; Kenny, Anthony. Philosophy in the Modern World. Volumes 3 and 4. New York: Oxford University Press, Inc., 2007.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Nilo Lardizabal, O.P.

PHILO 15: CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY (3 units)
Course Description: The works of Friederich Nietzsche and Martin Heidegger will be explored to provide grounds for Postmodernity. Postmodernity will be sampled in the genealogical work of Michel Foucault.

Suggested Readings: Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy, Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Parts I and II) and The Genealogy of Morals; Heidegger, selections from Being and Time, The Origin of the Work of Art; Foucault’s The History of Sexuality, vol. I, selected essays.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Luis Soliven David, S.J.

AESTHETICS (2 units)
Course Description: The theory of art, subjective and objective elements of art; historical evolution of aesthetics; the philosophy of art and the beautiful; art as a symbol and as a meaning; art as part of culture and a medium of communication in society; religious art and its critical appraisal.

PHISCI: PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE (3 units)
Course Description: Introduction to the world of empirical science via actual immersion in the laboratory; the writing of journal records of experiences, the reading of philosophico – scientific articles gleaned from suggested Journals, and the reduction of thought – and – hand processes into ideograms.

Suggested Readings: HYLE, journal of Philosophy and Technology; Experiment and the Making of Meaning (David Gooding, 1990); The Science before Science (Anthony Rizzi, 2004); Professor’s Handouts.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Norberto Castillo, O.P.

PHILO 112: SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY (3 units)
Course Description: A philosophical course concerning the nature of society. It discusses the conjugal and parental societies, the origin and the material cause of society; civil authority, different forms of government and international society.

Suggested Readings: Morkuniene, Jurate. Social Philosophy: Paradigm of Contemporary Thinking. Washington, D.C.: Council for Research in Values and Philosophy, c2004; Salgado, Pedro. Social Problem and Revolution. Pangasinan: Pedro V. Salgado, 2009; Salgado, Pedro. Social Encyclicals: Commentary and Critique. Quezon City, 1992; Salgado, Pedro. Ang Kristiyanismo ay Rebolusyonaryo. 1989.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Herminio Dagohoy, O.P.

PHL 209: PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION (3 units)
Course Description: This is a philosophical study on the religious phenomenon of peoples. It will basically answer the questions on God’s existence and His attributes. Furthermore, it shall also discuss the following issues: problem of evil, free will and providence, miracles and religious experiences, religious language and the rationality of religious belief, morality and immortality, and the relationship of science and religion. It will also discuss the presence of other world religions with the aim of evaluating and understanding religious pluralism.

Suggested Readings: Brown, Stuart. Philosophy of Religion. New York: Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. 2001; Cahn, Steven, ed. Exploring Philosophy of Religion: An Introductory Anthology. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009; Davies, Brian. An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. New York: Oxford University Press, 1982; Hick, John, ed. The Existence of God. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co., Inc., 1964; Murray, Michael and Rea. An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008.

Professor: Joel C. Sagut

PHILO 113: ORIENTAL PHILOSOPHY I: CHINESE PHILOSOPHY (3 units)
Course Description: A Study of the philosophical context of the East particularly of India and China.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Richard G. Ang, O.P.

ORIENTAL PHILOSOPHY II: INDIAN PHILOSOPHY (3 units)
Course Description: This deals with the philosophies of Hinduism and Buddhism including the main philosophical tenets and systems of India: The Upanishads, the Bhagavadgita, Classical Hindu systems and commentaries, Hinayana, Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Nilo Lardizabal, O.P. / Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P.

PHILO 706: MARXISM / PHILOSOPHY OF COMMUNISM (3 units)
Course Description: Its ideological system, sources and critical evaluation thereof; its main political regimes; its international movement

Suggested Readings: Pedro V. Salgado, Christianity is revolutionary. Quezon City: R.P. Garcia, 1976; Pedro V. Salgado, Essays U.S. bases spirituality of liberation. Quezon City: [Santo Domingo Convent], c1989; Virgilio Ojoy, Marxism and religion : a fusion of horizons. Manila : UST Publishing House, 2001; Andrew Collier, Christianity and Marxism : a philosophical contribution to their reconciliation. London New York: Routledge, 2001; Webb, Darren. Marx, Marxism and Utopia. Burlington, USA : Ashgate, 2000; Marcus Roberts, Analytical Marxism: a critique. London and New York : Verso, c1996; Ronald Aronson, After Marxism. London : Guilford Press, c1995; Douglas Kellner, Critical theory, Marxism, and modernity. Baltimore : John Hopkins University Press, c1989; McLellan, David. Marxism : essential writings. New York : Oxford University Press, c1988.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Pedro Salgado, O.P.

PHL 116: SOCIAL DOCTRINE OF THE CHURCH (3 units)
Course Description: The course deals with an in-depth study of the response of the Catholic Church to the socio-economic, political, cultural and moral concerns of the times. Among the issues it tackles are human promotion and human rights, justice and peace, labor, ideologies, Church and State relations, media education and ecology, and the Church’s Preferential Option for the Poor. It enables the students to analyze and reflect on the signs of the times in the light of the ideals and values of the Gospel embodied in the Social Encyclicals and fosters in them a sense of Christian responsibility.

Suggested Readings: Salgado, Pedro. Social Encyclicals: Commentary and Critique. Quezon City, 1992; Pontificium Consilium de Iustitia et Pace. Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church. Washington: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2004; The Social Encyclicals.

Professor: Joel C. Sagut

PHILO 301: SP. QQ. IN ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY (2 units)
Course Description: The Universe and Demiurge (Timeans), Friendship, Love and Immortality (Symposium), The Good (the Republic), The Concept of Immortality (Phaedo), Beings and the Understanding of Beings (the Republic), Unmoved Movers (Aristotle), Pleasure and Happiness (Aristotle).

Suggested Readings: The Republic (trans. Desmond Dee, 2007); Timeans and Critias (trans. Desmond Dee, 1977); Symposium (trans. C. Hill, 1999); Nicomachean Ethics (Aristotle); Physics (Aristotle); Cohen et. al. (eds), Readings in Ancient Greek Philosophy, Plato and Aristotle (Reale, Giovanni, 1990); A New History of Western Philosophy (Anthony Kenny, 2006); Basic Concepts of Ancient Philosophy (Martin Heidegger, 2008); From the Beginning to Plato (W.K.C. Taylor, 1997).

Professor: Rev. Fr. Herminio Dagohoy, O.P.

PHILO 303: SP. QQ IN MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY (2 units)
Course Description: This course in intended for graduate students (PhL and Ph.D. students). A good background in Theology would be helpful. The focus of this course is a treatment of the metaphysics of the “Image of the Trinity” from the order of nature. It looks at the human person from this perspective and hence, the meaning of “rationality” assumes a new twist. The basic works of St. Thomas provides the fundamental premises. It is strongly advised that the students can read Latin texts.

Suggested Readings: Aquinas, St. Thomas. Scriptum super Sententiis. www.corpus thomisticum.org; Aquinas, St. Thomas. Questiones Disputatae De Veritate. www.corpusthomisticum.org; Aquinas, St. Thomas. Summa Theologiae. New York: Christian Classics, 1948; Augustine. The Trinity. New York: New City Press, 2000; Clarke, Norris, S.J. Person and Being. Milwaukee: Marquette Univ. Press, 1993; Elders, Leo, S.V.D. Philosophical Theology of St. Thomas Aquinas. New York: E. J. Brill, 1990; Merriell, D. Juvenal. To the Image of the Trinity (A Study in the Development of Aquinas Teaching). Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1990; Torrell, Jean-Pierre, O.P. Initiation à Saint Thomas d’Aquin (Sa personne et son oeuvre). France: Editions Universitaires Fribourg Suisse, c.1993; Torrell, Jean-Pierre, O.P. St. Thomas Aquinas, Spiritual Master. Vol.2. Washington D.C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 2003.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Maximo P. Gatela, O.P.

PHILO 305: SP. QQ. IN MODERN PHILOSOPHY (2 units)
The course aims to highlight particular philosophical trends such as the notion of God, politics, ethics and morality, etc. in an era (14th century to the close of the last century) struggling with the growing uncertainty and skepticism to such themes.

Readings: Radcliffe, Elizabeth, and Richard McCarty, eds. Late Modern Philosophy : essential readings with commentary. Oxford: Blackwell Pub. Ltd., 2007; Martinich, A.P. Early Modern Philosophy: essential readings with commentary. Oxford: Blackwell Pub., 2007; Kolak, Daniel. The Longman Standard History of Modern Philosophy. New York: Pearson/Longman, 2006; Ariew, Roger. Modern Philosophy: an anthology of primary sources. Indianapolis: Hackett, 1998; Scruton, Roger. A Short History of Modern Philosophy: from Descartes to Wittgenstein. London: Routledge, 1995; Kenny, Anthony. Philosophy in the Modern World. Volumes 3 and 4. New York: Oxford University Press, Inc., 2007.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Nilo A. Lardizabal, O.P.

PHILO 309: SP. QQ IN CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY (2 units)
Course Description: This course will initiate the students to the political philosophy of Michel Foucault, which will serve as an introduction to Post Modernity.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Luis Soliven David, S.J.

PHL 311: SP. QQ IN RATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (2 units)
Course Description: Special QQ in Rational Psychology will focus on and establish an in-depth treatment of specific themes (such as mind-body problem, intelligence, emotions, etc.) introduced in Rational Psychology.

General Content: With the growth of the cognitive and practical sciences, Philosophy is once again challenged to provide a more vivid explanation on the nature of the mind and its relationship with the body. Thus, the rise of differing philosophical treatises on the mind is an opportunity to view the current dilemma using the Scholastic thought. The subject shall consider the current debate on the matter from the vintage point of Thomistic Philosophy.

Course Objectives:
Cognitive: To improve the students’ critical thinking, especially, on the identified and enduring philosophical arguments in Rational Psychology.

Affective: To increase the students’ sense of value on the philosophical treatment of the mind-body problem.

Psychomotor: To aid the student in the valid applications of the knowledge learned with real-life situations.

Suggested Readings: Aristotle’s De Anima; Aquinas’ Commentary on Aristotle’s De Anima; Benedict Ashley, Aristotle’s De Sensu et Senato and De Memoria et Reminiscenta as Thomistic Sources. Ira Altman, The Concept of Intelligence; Maria Lukac de Stier, Aristotle’s De Anima as Source for Aquinas’ Anthropological Doctrine; York Gunther, Nonconceptuality and the Emotions; Anthony Lisska, Thomas Aquinas on Phantasia: Rooted in but Transcending Aristotle’s De Anima. Alejandro Llano, The Different Senses of ‘Being’ according to Aristotle and Aquinas; Angelo Campodonico, Philosophical Anthropology Facing Aquinas? Concept of Human Nature; Mary Tjiattas, Functional Irrationality.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Arthur Dingel, O.P.

PHILO 303: SP. QQ IN METAPHYSICS (2 units)
Course Description: This course is intended for the graduate students of the Ecclesiastical Faculty. It therefore aims to directly deal with the original (Latin) text of St. Thomas Aquinas, namely one of his Philosophical Opuscula: De Esse et Essentia. It begins by historically situating this particular work in time and place. This main work is to look at the 6 chapters very closely and note is essential points. These points will be later compared to his mature work, the Summa Theologiae, if there are elements that “changed” and their implications. The interpretations will be guided by the works of three thomistic scholars: Cajetan, Armand Mauer, and Joseph Bobik.

Suggested Readings: Aquinas, St. Thomas. De Esse et Essentia. www.corpusthomisticum.org; Aquinas, St. Thomas. Summa Theologiae. Prima Pars. Maryland: Christian Classics, 1948; Bobik, Joseph (trans.). Aquinas on Being and Essence. Indiana: Univ. of Notre Dame Press, 1965; Kendzierski, Lottie and Francis Wade (trans.). Cajetan Commentary on Being and Essence. Milwaukee: Marquette Univ. Press, 1964; Mauer, Armand. On Being and Essence. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies; Torrel, Jean – Pierre, O.P. St. Thomas, The Person and His Work. vol. 1. Washington D.C.: The Catholic University of America, 1996. Weisheipl, James, O.P. Friar Thomas D’Aquino, His Life, Thought and Work. New York: Doubleday, 1974.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Maximo Gatela, O.P.

PHILO 308: (SP. QQ IN THEODICY - SPECIAL QUESTIONS IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF GOD: PROCESS THOUGHT ON GOD) (2 units)
Course Description/ Course Outline: Actual Entities in Process Thought (The social nature of reality; Prehension, concrescence and related concepts; and God as constitutive); God in Whitehead’s Version of Process Philosophy (God as actual entity; God’s primordial nature; God’s consequent nature; and God and the world); God in Hartshorne’s Version of Process Philosophy (The Theory of Dipolarity; God’s abstract and concrete natures; and God and the (non) problem of evil); Process Philosophy as Panentheistic (Panentheism as distinguished from pantheism; Panentheism is not a bad word!; and The development of process philosophy of God).

Suggested Readings: Alfred North Whitehead. (1978). Process and Reality. New York: The Free Press; Adventures of Ideas. (1956). New York: The Macmillan Company; Charles Hartshorne. (1948). The divine relativity: a social conception of God. London: Yale University Press; The logic of perfection (1962 & 1991). Illinois: Open Court; Omnipotence and other theological mistakes (1984). Albany: State University of New York; Cobb, John. (2007). A Christian natural theology, 2nd ed. London: Westminster John Knox Press; Cobb, John & Griffin, David. (1976). Process theology: an introductory exposition. London, Westminster John Knox Press. Griffin, David Ray (2001). Reenchantment without supernaturalism: a process philosophy of religion. Ithaca: Cornell University Press; Veken, Jan van der (1987). Process thought and the Christian doctrine of God. Leuven: Center for Metaphysics and Philosophy of God

Professor: Rev. Fr. Ranhilio Callangan Aquino

PHILO 304: SP. QQ IN EPISTEMOLOGY (2 units)
Course Description: This course gives special attention to the philosophical issues immanent to the dynamic process of knowing, covering epistemological paradigms from the ancient up to the contemporary period. As a “special” class, the plantilla shall proceed with the natural assumption that the students have at least encountered the fundamental issues on knowledge and its acquisition at the backdrop of the Western – Continental setting. Nonetheless, a refresher on the basic paradigms shall be provided as a form of refresher.

Suggested Readings:
Primary Sources: Feinberg, Joel and Russ Shafer – Landau (eds.). Reason and Responsibility Readings in Some Basic Problems of Philosophy. USA: Wadsworth, 1999; Heil, John. Philosophy of Mind a Guide and Anthology. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004; Huemer, Michael (ed.) Epistemology Contemporary Readings. London: Routledge, 2002; Kearney, Richard & Mara Rainwater (eds.). Continental Philosophy Reader. Routledge: London, 1996; Moser, Paul K. and Arnold vander Nat (eds.) Human Knowledge Classical and Contemporary Approaches. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987. O’Neil, Reginald F. (ed.) Readings in Epistemology. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1962; Pojman, Louis P. (ed.) The Theory of Knowledge Classical and Contemporary Readings. Canada: Wadsworth, 2003. Schmitt, Frederick F. (ed.) Theories of Truth. Oxford, UK: Blackwell, 2004.

Secondary Sources: Audi, Robert. Epistemology A Contemporary Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. New York: Routledge, 1998; Baergen, Ralph. Contemporary Philosophy. Texas: Harcourt Brace and Company, 1995; Bahm, Archie. Epistemology: Theory of Knowledge. Albuquerque, N.M.: World Books, 1995; Macann, Christopher. Four Phenomenological Philosophers Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty. Routledge: London, 1993; Papanoustsos, Evangelos P. The Foundations of Knowledge, ed. John P. Anton. New York: State University of New York Press, 1968. Rebollo, Maximiliano OP. Philosophy of Knowledge Lecture Notes. UST Faculty of Philosophy (1997-1998); Van Steenberghen, Fernand. Epistemology, trans. Rev. Martin J. Flynn, STD. New York: Joseph F. Wagner, Inc., 1949.

Professor: Dr. Fleurdeliz Altez

SP. QQ. IN ORIENTAL PHILOSOPHY (SPECIAL QUESTIONS IN CONFUCIAN PHILOSOPHY)
(2 units)
Course Description: This involves an in-depth study of two fundamental Confucian concepts of Li and Ren. Discussion focuses on the origins, evolution and nuances of these two concepts in the early Ru Jia.

Suggested Readings:
Primary Sources: Dawson, Raymond, trans. Confucius: The Analects. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993. Legge, James, trans. The Chinese Classics: Confucian Analects, The Great Learning,The Doctrine of the Mean. (Volume 1). Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 1960. Legge, James, trans. The Chinese Classics: Mencius. (Volume 2). Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 1960. Watson, Burton, trans. Basic Writings: Hsun Tzu. London: Columbia University Press, 1963.

Secondary Sources: Berthrong, John H. and Evelyn Nagai. Confucianism: A Short Introduction. Oxford: Oneworld Publications, 2000. Bownas, Geoffrey, trans. Confucius: His Life and Thought. Shigeki Kaizuka. New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 2002. Co, Alfredo P. The Bloom of a Hundred Flowers: Philosophy of Ancient China. Manila: University of Santo Tomas Publishing House, 1992. Liu, Jeeloo. An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2006.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Richard G. Ang, O.P.

PHILO 307: SP. QQ IN ETHICS (2 units)
A study of the core issues of bioethics from a catholic viewpoint.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Richard G. Ang, O.P.




B. AUXILIARY COURSES
LATIN I: GRAMMAR AND SYNTAX I (2 units)
Course Content: Pronunciation of Ecclesiastical Latin; Nouns: An Overview; First Declension Nouns; Prepositions: An Overview; Second Declension Masculine Nouns; Present Tense of the Copulative Verb sum ‘to be’; Kind of Sentences; Direct Statements; Agreement of Subject and Verb; Genitive Possession; Second Declension Neuter Nouns; Imperfect Tense of sum ‘to be’; Future Tense of sum ‘to be’; Dative of the Possessor; Adjectives: An Overview; First/Second Declension Adjectives; Agreement of Adjective and Noun; Nominal Sentences; How to Answer Syntax Questions (1); Third Declension Nouns: Masculine or Feminine; Third Declension Nouns: Neuter; Third Declension Nouns: Masculine or Feminine i-Stems; Third Declension Nouns: Neuter i-Stems; Third Declension Adjectives; Fourth Declension Nouns: Masculine (or Feminine); Fourth Declension Nouns: Neuter; Fifth Declension Nouns; Verbs: An Overview; The Present-Stem System: Three Tenses; Present Indicative Active: First Conjugation; Word Order; Coordination (Compound Sentences); Accusative as Direct Object; Dative as Indirect Object; Ablative as Separation; Compounding of Verbs: Prepositions as Prefixes; Parsing; Present Indicative Active: Second Conjugation; Present Indicative Active: Third Conjugation; Present Indicative Active: Fourth Conjugation; Direct Questions (1); Ablative Means; Ablative Manner; Present Indicative Passive: All Four Conjugations; Ablative of Personal Agency; Ablative with Certain Adjectives; Imperfect Indicative Active: All Four Conjugations; Imperfect Indicative Passive: All Four Conjugations; Future Indicative Active: First and Second Conjugations; Future Indicative Passive: First and Second Conjugations; Future Indicative Active: Third and Fourth Conjugations; Future Indicative Passive: Third and Fourth Conjugations; Subordination (Complex Sentences); Causal Clauses; Indirect Statements (1): Object Clauses; Ellipsis; Infinitive as Subject; Ablative of Respect (Specification)

Suggested Reading: Collins, John. The Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin. Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University Press, 1985.

Professor/s: Rev. Fr. Maximo Gatela, O.P. / Rev. Fr. Franklin Beltran, O.P. / Rev. Fr. Reynaldo Adalid, O.P. / Rev. Fr. Isidro Abaño, O.P.

LATIN 2: GRAMMAR AND SYNTAX II (2 units)
Course Content: The Perfect-Active System: Three Tenses; Perfect Indicative Active: All Four Conjugations; Relative Pronoun/Interrogative Adjective: qui, quae, quod; Uses of the Relative Pronoun; Use of Interrogative Adjective; Pluperfect Indicative Active: All Four Conjugations; Future-Perfect Indicative Active: All Four Conjugations; Ablative of Cause; Direct Quotations; The Auxiliary Verb possum ‘be able’: All Six Indicative Tenses; Complementary Infinitive; Object Infinitive ; The Perfect-Passive System: Three Compound Tenses; Perfect Indicative Passive: All Four Conjugations; Uses of the Perfect Passive Participle ; Pluperfect Indicative Passive: All Four Conjugations; Future-Perfect Indicative Passive: All Four Conjugations; Ablative Absolute; Temporal Clauses; Synopsis of a Verb; Genitive of Description; Ablative of Description; Subjective and Objective Genitive; Dative of Reference: Advantage or Disadvantage; Apposition; Concessive Clauses; Partitive Genitive; Dative with Certain Adjectives; Predicative Accusative; Cognate Accusative; Present Active Participles; Uses of the Present Active Participle; The Irregular Verb volo ‘wish’: All Six Indicative Tenses; The Irregular verb efi ‘go’: All Six Indicative Tenses; Accusative of Place to/into which; Ablative of Place Where; Ablative of Place from which / out of which; Locative Case; Future Active Participle; Future Passive Participle; Periphrastic Conjugation; Dative of Personal Agency with Dative Periphrastics; Review of Participles; Direct Commands (or Requests) (1): Imperative Mood; Vocative Case; Personal Pronouns; Double Accusative; Deponent Verbs; Semi-Deponent Verbs; Subjunctive Mood: An Overview; Present Subjunctive: First Conjugation; Direct Commands (or Requests) (2); How to Answer Syntax Questions (2); Present Subjunctive: Second, Third, and Fourth Conjugations; Direct Commands (or Requests) (3): Jussive Subjunctive; Direct Questions (2): Deliberative Subjunctive; Conditional Clauses (1) ; Imperfect Subjunctive; Sequences of Tenses: Subordinate Use of Subjunctives; Purpose Clauses; Infinitive or Purpose; Indirect Commands (or Requests); Present Subjunctives of sum and possum; Emphatic Demonstrative Pronouns/Adjectives: hie and ille; Unemphatic Demonstrative Pronouns / Adjectives: is and iste; Result Clauses; Characterizing Relative Clauses; Present Subjunctives or eo and volo; Intensive Pronoun / Adjective: ipse; Conditional Clauses (2): Present Contrafactual; Gerundives; Gerunds; Pluperfect Subjunctive; Conditional Clauses (3): Past Contrafactual; Clauses of Fearing; Unattainable Wishes; Indirect Statements (2): Object Clauses with Subjunctives; Perfect Subjunctive; Direct Questions (3); Indirect Questions; Donec and dum Clauses; Interrogative Pronoun: quis, quid; Adverbial Accusative; Comparison of Adjectives: Positive, Comparative, and Superlative; Ablative Comparison; Ablative of Degree of Difference; Reflexive Adjective and Pronouns: suus; ---, sui; Six Partly Irregular Verbs; Comparison of Adverbs; Cum Clauses; Indefinite Pronouns and Adjectives: quis, aliquis, aliqui, etc. ; Dative of Purpose; Double Dative Construction; Review of Clauses: Time, Cause, and Concession; Present Infinitives: Active and Passive; Negative Direct Commands (or Requests); Indirect Statements (3) Subject Accusative and Present Infinitive; Present Infinitives: Active and Passive; Indirect Statements (4): Subject Accusative and Perfect Infinitive; Predicative Genitive; Conditional Relative Clauses; Future Active Infinitive; Indirect Statements (5): Subject Accusative and Future Infinitive; Indirect Reflexives; Summary of Ways to Express Purpose; The Irregular Verb fero; Ablative of Time When or Time within Which; Accusative of Extent of Time or Space; Ablative of Duration of Time; Summary of Conditional Clauses; The Irregular verb flo; Some Cardinal and Ordinal Numerals; Impersonal Verbs; Summary of Uses of the Genitive Case; Summary of Uses of the Dative Case; Greek Periphrastic Tenses; Syncopated and Shortened Perfect-Active System Forms; Historical Present; Cognate Ablative; Summary of Uses of the Accusative Case; Summary of Uses of the Ablative Case;

Suggested Reading: Collins, John. The Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin. Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University Press, 1985.

Professor/s: Rev. Fr. Maximo Gatela, O.P. / Rev. Fr. Franklin Beltran, O.P. / Rev. Fr. Reynaldo Adalid, O.P. / Rev. Fr. Isidro Abaño, O.P.

Latin III (2 units)
Course Description: Follow-up of the lessons of Latin I and II. This will intensify the lessons on Grammar and Syntax. This course will also introduce the students to textual reading and interpretations.

Professor/s: Rev. Fr. Norberto M. Castillo, O.P. / Rev. Fr. Franklin Beltran, O.P.

LATIN IV (2 units)
Course Description: Diagnostic exams on Latin I-III achievement, mastery and reinforcement exercises (October - November), Reading and Interpretation of Latin texts.

Suggested Readings: Bible in Latin; Summa Theologica IIa – Iiae in Latin; QQ. Disp. De Veritate De Potentia; Elementa Philosophiae, Gredt, Vols. I & II

Professor/s: Rev. Fr. Norberto M. Castillo, O.P. / Rev. Fr. Franklin Beltran, O.P. / Rev. Fr. Ferdinand Bautista, O.P.

NS 101: BIOLOGY (3 units)
Course Description: A course designed to give the student a comprehensive and broad treatment of Biology’s principles and concepts. The study aims t expose the student to the scientific methods of inquiry, observation and laboratory investigation.

Professor/s: Rev. Fr. Lauro de Dios, O.P. / Asst. Prof. Josefino Castillo

NS 102: PHYSICAL SCIENCE (3 units)
Fundamental Principles and concepts of chemistry as symbols, formulas, and equation writing; basic concept of atomic structure and the laws governing chemical changes. Elements and inorganic compounds which are common to everyday living.

Professor/s: Asst. Prof. Sotera Gelvero / Rev. Fr. Lauro de Dios, O.P.

ENG 101A: GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION (3 units)
Course Description: This course focuses on an intensive review of the fundamentals and grammar and sentence structure, with a view of making students acquire sufficiency in both oral and written discourse. The course’s main objective is to teach students formulate grammatically correct expression.

Professor: Ms. Mary Joyce Laig

ENG 101B: ADVANCE GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION (3 units)
Course Description: This course emphasizes on the study of the elements of composition – unity, coherence, emphasis and economy with a view of making students realize that correctness of expression must be coupled with effectiveness and style. The course’s main objective is the application in speaking and writing of knowledge acquired in English I.

Professor: Ms. Mary Joyce Laig

SOCIOLOGY (3 units)

EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 units)
Course Description: The positive investigation of sensation and sensitive affectivity. It comprises the anatomy, physiology and the processes of the external senses inclusive of the cutaneous, kinesthetic and kinesthetic senses. With regard to the internal senses, it requires about their functions, processes, factors and cerebral locations. Finally, it discusses the theories concerning the nature, elements, properties, transference, repression, cerebral location of sensitive affections.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Dionisio Cabezon, O.P.

SEMINAR ON NEO-THOMISM AND MODERN PHILOSOPHY (2 units)

THWI: THESIS WRITING I (3 units)
Course Description: The norms to follow is the choice of topic. The method of taking cognizance of the information available with regard to the selected topic. The method of scientific research. The selection and study of the sources. The methods of arranging materials and of writing the thesis itself.

Professor/s: Team Teaching

THESIS II: THESIS WRITING II (3 units)
Course Description: Writing of the thesis, selection of moderator, library work, regular reporting of work progress, regular attendance at classes for review of comprehensive examination. Thesis Colloquium.

Professor/s: Rev. Fr. Norberto M. Castillo, O.P. and Team

THESIS WRITING III (3 units)
Course Description: Completing the writing of the thesis. Public defense of the thesis. Written comprehensive examination. Completion of the post-defense requirements.

Professor/s: Rev. Fr. Norberto M. Castillo, O.P. and Team



C. SPECIAL COURSES
THY 1: HISTORY OF SALVATION (3 units)
This course is a critical and reflective look into the different moments of God’s intervention in the history of humanity, gradually disclosing Himself and His plan of salvation through persons and events, until this revelation reached its fullness in the incarnation of His Son, our Lord Jesus Christ. The whole history of salvation has for its central figure the person of Jesus Christ. Hence, salvation history, in its very nature, is Christocentric. It is in Jesus that the entire history of humanity finds meaning. It is also to him that history tends. Because of this, all events and persons in the history of salvation are seen in the light of the person of Jesus, apart from whom they have no value. The course shall make use of the Sacred Scriptures as its primary textbook since it is the Bible that contains the record of God’s interventions with humanity and the testimonies of the members of early Church about their encounters with Jesus. The course therefore inevitably involves the actual reading of Scriptures in class in order to discover how God’s Word, enveloped in human words, continues to communicate to humanity today; and at the same time to facilitate a dialogue between the text of the Bible and the day-to-day life of the Filipino student.

The courses is divided into three parts. Part 1 is the Introduction, Part 2 is the Old Testament, and Part 3 is the New Testament. Theoogy 1 is a three-hours-a-week, three-unit credit course to be completed within one semester.

Required Readings: The New American Bible or The New Revised Standard Version; Esma, Victoria and Pazcoguin, Richard. Salva Vida: Salvation History and Study for College. Manila: UST Publishing House, 2008.

Professor: Assoc. Prof. Richard Pazcoguin

HIST 102: CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
A discussion about the proto-anthropological forms of man according to recent discoveries, comparative morphology, and the theory of evolution. It also discusses the biblical text and the doctrine of the magisterium of the origin of man.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Hermel O. Pama, O.P.

EDMETH: EDUCATION METHODOLOGY (THE TEACHING OF PHILOSOPHY IN THE SEMINARY: PRACTICE, METHODS, AND SOURCES) (3 units)
Course Description: This course aims at providing instructions and training (practicum) for those whose future ministry is to teach in the seminary. This will cover the following courses: Introduction to Philosophy, Logic, Mathematical Logic, Ancient Philosophy, Medieval Philosophy, Cosmology and Philosophy of Science, Ethics, Rational Psychology, Epistemology, Modern and Contemporary Philosophy.

Professor/s: Rev. Fr. Jesus Miranda, O.P. and Team

PHILO D2: READINGS ON SCIENCE, SOCIETY AND SCIENTISTS
Course Description: The students are exposed to a variety of selected articles available in journals including those which can be downloaded in data bases. Aside from selected texts from Ilya Prigogine, Nancy Nernessian, and David Gooding, a special emphasis is made on Nobel Prize winners in science, medicine, and technology. This course is primarily intended for licentiate and doctoral candidates, so the range of discussions and oral exercises is encompassed from the most basic to a more advanced interdisciplinary levels and exposure. Other experts are invited to dialogue with the students.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Norberto M. Castillo, O.P.



D. OTHER COURSES (Courses required for the AB Classical Curriculum)

FIL 1: SINING NG PAKIKIPAGTALASTASAN (3 units)
Course Description: The course provides communication situations and exercises for developing the four (4) languages skills in Pilipino, namely reading, understanding, speaking and writing. The communication situations are of the expository, descriptive, narrative and argumentative types.

Professor: Ms. Myra de Leon



FIL 2: PANITIKANG PILIPINO: PAHAPYAW NA KASAYSAYAN AT MGA PILING KATHA Course Description: This course is a historical survey of Philippine Literature written in Pilipino from pre-Spanish period to the present, together with selected readings mostly from contemporary authors.

Professor: Ms. Myra de Leon



MATH I01: COLLEGE ALGEBRA
Course Description: This course deals with the set of integers – its properties and concepts of operations, especially for the signed numbers; set of rational numbers – giving the new approach to the study of fractions, its basic types, operations and applications; set of points – giving for statistical presentation of data.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Hector Mariñas, O.P.

MATH 102: TRIGONOMETRY Course Description: The course deals with the definition of circular functions in terms of the rectangular coordinate system which serves as the basic unifying link between trigonometry and analytic geometry, and makes it possible to use more simple and more direct methods. The analytic rather than the computational part of trigonometry is emphasized. Graphing, the applications of the circular functions in the description of many periodic phenomena, the general inverse function, logarithms, trigonometric equations and the solution of triangles are also stressed.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Hector Mariñas, O.P.

MATH 600A: STATISTICS (3 units)
Course Description: An introduction to statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, methods of sampling, tables, graphs, percentiles, concepts of probability, normal and chi-square distributions, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing of one and two means, proportions, binomial experiments, sample size calculations, correlation, and regression.

PGC: PHILIPPINE GOVERNMENT AND THE NEW CONSTITUTION (3 units)
Course Description: This course covers the concepts of State and Government, the history of the Philippine Government, the basic principles and concepts on Constitution, the Constitution of the Philippine Republic – its evolution and the innovation provided for in the New Constitution as compared with the old constitution.

Readings: The 1987 Constitution of the Republic of the Philippines; The Consitutions of the Republic of the Philippines (Volume 1 and 2): A Commentary by Fr. Joaquin Bernas, S.J.; Philippine Political Law by Justice Isagani Cruz; Postulates in Constitutional Law by Dean Angel Aguirre, Jr.; Handbook on Arrest, Search and Seizure by Justice Oscar M. Herrera; Handbook on Custodial Investigation by Justice Oscar M. Herrera.

Professor: Atty. Benedicto Buenaventura

PHIST: PHILIPPINE HISTORY The course centers its study on the roots and development of the Philippines, from its earliest known beginning up to the present, with special emphasis on the socio-historical and political perspectives of the country. It attempts to link the present to the past by considering the pageant of events that have shaped the nation’s course and provide the students a better view of the direction it takes toward the future. It also covers a board approach in the understanding of the role of the Philippines in the international community even as it is a multi-cultured, multilingual, multi-racial and multi-religious nation.

Professor: Assoc. Prof. Eloisa de Castro

SPD: SPEECH AND DEBATE (3 units)
Course Description: A course in interpretative reading and different types of oral communications. It includes a study of extemporaneous speeches, conference and kinds of group discussions.

RC: RIZAL COURSE (3 units)
Course Description: This course is a short biography of Dr. Jose P. Rizal together with his literary works. It aims at imparting to the students greater knowledge about his life and an appreciation of his writings.

Professor: Asst. Prof. Eloisa de Castro

PHILO 114: SOCIAL ECONOMICS AND LABOR LAWS (3 units)
Course Description: A study of the labor laws and their more practical provisions, e.g. The Industrial Peace Act, The Minimum Wage Law, The Workman’s Compensation Act; Social Security Law and the rules and regulation promulgated by competent agencies for their implementation.

Required Readings: Presidential Decree No. 442 as amended; The Labor Code of the Philippines (Compiled, Edited and Published by Vicente B. Foz); Philippine Labor Laws and Jurisprudence (The Updated Labor Code and other Labor Laws) by C.A. Azucena, Jr.; Law on Labor Relations and Termination of Employment (Annotated) by Joselito G. Chan.

Professor: Atty. Benedicto Buenaventura

LIT 102: FILIPINO LITERATURE IN ENGLISH (3 units)
Course Description: A course designed to acquaint the students with the works of Filipino writers in English.

Professor: Dr. Florentino Hornedo

TAR: TAXATION AND AGRARIAN REFORM (3 units)
Course Description: This course gives the essential features embodied in the Land Reform of the Philippines, the laws, the decrees, the agencies and government undertakings in connection therewith. It also discusses the Tax Laws that every citizen must know and the manner to comply with the said laws.

Professor: Atty. Benedicto Buenaventura

LIT 226: CLASSICAL LITERATURE
Course Description: A survey of the beginnings of world literature with emphasis on the classical literature of Greece and Rome.

Professor: Dr. Florentino Hornedo

LIT 228: WESTERN LITERATURE
Course Description: A study of the major literary movements in Western countries from Dante to the end of the 19th century.

Professor: Dr. Florentino Hornedo

PHL GC: GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING
Course Description: An orientation course in Guidance, its nature and principles. This includes the implication of guidance in education and currently accepted guidance practices in schools. This course will acquaint and equip the students with an understanding of the different aspects of a functional school guidance program.

Professor: Rev. Fr. Dionisio Cabezon

ESSAY I: ESSAY AND ESSAY WRITING
Course Description: A course in essay and the writing of different essay forms. Writing progresses from short compositions to a term paper or research paper.

 

Copyright © UST Ecclesiastical Faculty of Philosophy http://ecclephilo.ust.edu.ph All rights reserved 2010